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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2011 3:47 am 
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Knight
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One of the most important thing is DON'T START MORE THAN TWO PROJECTS before you complete them. If you're working on a lot of projects, you will lose interest in doing the first ones and you won't coplete them. ( My own experience ) :)


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2011 5:36 am 
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Larc
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BlackPhantom wrote:
Let me reiterate don't bite off more then you can chew. Just always be open.


If you feel you can do it by building on your existing knowledge, for instance you can visualise the overall structure of your program and can imagine one new but massive thereby hard work and shit hot feature, go for it. Just make sure you back up your game before hand. This stanza in a poem I wrote recently sums up the feeling better perhaps:

Quote:
Do your ideas provoke a question?
Seek the answer to the provoked questions.
Even if the answers aren't found you're left with the means,
The thoughts,
The aftermath,
For better calling of the question.


Mouzy wrote:
One of the most important thing is DON'T START MORE THAN TWO PROJECTS before you complete them. If you're working on a lot of projects, you will lose interest in doing the first ones and you won't coplete them. ( My own experience ) :)


If your two ideas are related on any level then perhaps they can be combined? I see no point in feeling like you're spreading yourself thin when instead you could be feeling like you're on your masterwork.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 3:15 pm 
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Live-Dimension wrote:
If you've never programmed before, then get yourself Game maker. Seriously.

Start simple. Game maker is fantastic as it lets you mess around with game development without needing to get your hands dirty in hard code. When you've messed around with Drag'n'Drop, then you can use GML (Game Maker Language) to start coding your games and messing around with it. If you have fun with game maker, then you should really enjoy game development as a whole.

After GM, well, that's where things get complicated. To me, it really comes down to two languages - c++ and c#. c++ is alot more complex, but you're given alot more flexibilty. c# isn't that much slower then c++ at all, and you're given all the .net libraries, XNA, and so many other useful items. Of course, this means that you're a little restricted to Windows, although you can mess around with Mono, one of my favourite games (Osu!) is still yet to be ported.

If you love GM's simplicity and don't wish to make your own engine, I highly suggest you give unity a shot. You can code in C#, Javascript or "Boo" and it's not that difficult to get 2D games going on it once you get some things sorted out.

However, the best advice is simple.
Don't give up!
and also
Don't bite more then you can chew!
and also
Don't be afraid to ask for some help, but don't ask how to do every little thing either. You'll never get anywhere doing that.
and finally
READ THE FLIPPING DOCUMENTATION, TUTORIALS AND OTHER ONLINE HELP! Use google!

Game development is torture. It'll make you wish you've never been born at times, especially when you go down the more advanced routes such as c++, or making your own engine out of OGL/DX/etc. Until you're confident enough to tackle them, don't look at them, don't even think of them. Use the cross platform libraries such as SFML and SDL. They'll save your sanity as well as massive amounts of time. I believe they can be used on both c++ and c#.

Game development is also amazing fun. It's cool watching your game slowly shape itself, and it's an amazing feeling spending hours working on some complex system then seeing it all come to life when you debug and play it. You're creating something that's uniquely yours, and no one can take that away from you. No one. It's just kick-ass awesome seeing the thing you've created take life and play, and nothing beats hearing other people enjoy your game.

Game Development - It's one hell of a ride, but you've got to work for it.


All of that is very good, as well as the other posts you guys spent a lot of time writing for this thread. :D


The stuff I've been thinking about lately is that if you're serious about "real programming" (ala, C++, C# game dev or programming in general), the next step after being comfortable with your language is design patterns. Learn them. They will (1): Make it a lot easier to communicate your intent to other developers ("I'm using an Observer pattern for..."), and (2) They keep you from reinventing the wheel in a way; they're just logical patterns for how to get shit done.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2011 4:55 am 
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Zora
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I'm with you on that, Moosader. A good grounding in design patterns will save you a wealth of time!

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2011 7:11 am 
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Larc
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Learn and use C - C is the way to express your ideas to another programmer, and is an incredible jumping off point. I really learnt what OOP is all about for instance by using C that doesn't have it in. If you can express it in C your solution can be done on most machines.

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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 1:30 am 
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Goomba
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@Moosader:

I concur on your recommendation on design patterns.

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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 8:20 am 
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Ploe wrote:
Learn and use C - C is the way to express your ideas to another programmer, and is an incredible jumping off point. I really learnt what OOP is all about for instance by using C that doesn't have it in. If you can express it in C your solution can be done on most machines.


This seems difficult for me; I tend to explain solutions in the concept of "Objects" and "What they do". D:

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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 8:39 am 
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Goblin
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Moosader wrote:
Ploe wrote:
Learn and use C - C is the way to express your ideas to another programmer, and is an incredible jumping off point. I really learnt what OOP is all about for instance by using C that doesn't have it in. If you can express it in C your solution can be done on most machines.


This seems difficult for me; I tend to explain solutions in the concept of "Objects" and "What they do". D:


In my opinion C is really a good way to prove that your software could run on any platform, since there are several
microcontrollers and other computers that do not feature any OOP.
But a good programmer should also be familiar with other concepts than imperative programming, just
like OOP or even logical programming.
Remember that it always depends on what problem you are trying to solve.
If you want to create an abstract view of several objects that can somehow be connected to each other
(either by association or aggregation), a language like Java is the best you can use.
If your program only does some dirty stuff like only converting a file, an imperative programming language might
fit.
Just my two cents.


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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 11:02 am 
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Scheibenhonig wrote:
Moosader wrote:
Ploe wrote:
Learn and use C - C is the way to express your ideas to another programmer, and is an incredible jumping off point. I really learnt what OOP is all about for instance by using C that doesn't have it in. If you can express it in C your solution can be done on most machines.


This seems difficult for me; I tend to explain solutions in the concept of "Objects" and "What they do". D:


In my opinion C is really a good way to prove that your software could run on any platform, since there are several
microcontrollers and other computers that do not feature any OOP.
But a good programmer should also be familiar with other concepts than imperative programming, just
like OOP or even logical programming.
Remember that it always depends on what problem you are trying to solve.
If you want to create an abstract view of several objects that can somehow be connected to each other
(either by association or aggregation), a language like Java is the best you can use.
If your program only does some dirty stuff like only converting a file, an imperative programming language might
fit.
Just my two cents.


Yeah, it depends on what you're trying to build.

File parser: Scripting language with Regex
Comprehensive banking system architecture: OOP (imho)
Utility program (vague statement...): C
???: Functional (once I figure this out, I'd like to learn a functional language. :)

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:25 pm 
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Smushed Goomba
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Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 7:01 pm
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The hardest part I've encountered while trying to build a game is how to ask the right questions. There is alot of times I didn't know what to ask to solve my problem and google obviously doesn't give me the answer to a question I don't know.

I generally just copy and paste my code into google and see what pops up, alot of the time I'll actually find something useful just reading thru a bunch of the search results. Linked lists for example is something I've only recently begun to enjoy and appearently it's a big deal in game design for alot of people, I found it randomly while searching my std map code on google.


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